Tim de Putter

About me

Hi, my name is Tim, I'm a software developer living in Emden, which is located at the beautiful north sea coast of germany.

thats me

For the majority of the code I have written I used C#, Java, Javascript, Ruby, C and C++. I took my first steps in languages like Pascal and Basic in the mid 1990s and lately played a bit with functional programming in Elixir/Erlang, as well as Haskell, purescript and elm.
I'm also into test driven development, domain driven design and simple design.

For most of my sideprojects I like to let vim suck the ideas out of my brain, but I'm also not reluctant to ide's. For my dayjob this is mainly MS Visual Studio, but in the past I have made some experience with other ides (like intellij or eclipse) too.

When I'm not writing code I like to do sports like weightlifting in my homegym. I love traveling with my beautiful wife Steffi and sometimes I just have a beer (maybe some more) with my friends.

Projects

These are some of my spare time projects you can find online:

purescript-projections
my first purescript project

Purescript api-wrapper for geteventstore projections. Allows to write projections in a typesafe manner, thanks to purescripts awesome typesystem.

purescript-gun
purescript side project (wip)

Purescript api-wrapper for the gun.js database. Gun is a realtime, decentralized, offline-first, graph database engine written in javascript.

rendezvous
open source side project to lern elixir

Implementation of the Rendezvous or Highest Random Weight (HRW) hashing algorithm in the Elixir Programming Language (elixir-lang.org) Besides elixir I also tried out travis-ci and coveralls.

FitEx
open source side project to lern elixir macros

FitEx provides a simplified function definition syntax in elixir. I basically created it to try out elixirs meta programming capabilities.

rcqrs
open source project extracted from portlogs

Rcqrs is a framework which implements the cqrs pattern in ruby. (see cqrsinfo.com)

theriac
open source elixir side project (canceled)

Tried how clojure style transducers might look like in elixir. Conclusion: streams are equivalent.